Skip to main content

Fact Sheet

Information About Measure H

The Hayward Unified School District (HUSD) strives to prepare students to become dynamic leaders in our global society. Our dedicated teachers and strong academics challenge and motivate students to achieve success in the 21st century.

While we are proud of student achievement in our Hayward schools, our facilities have not kept pace. In order to maintain safe and modern learning environments, aging school facilities require necessary repairs and upgrades. As requirements for success rapidly change in the 21st century, our classrooms and labs need to be modernized to meet today’s educational standards for science, technology, engineering and math.

In 2008 and 2014, voters overwhelmingly approved Measure I and Measure L to fund an initial phase of upgrades. Our district has used these funds to make necessary school improvements to many of our schools, however, urgent repairs and upgrades are still needed to ensure all students have access to safe environments that promote high-quality learning.

The district is working to complete a thorough facility planning process to identify and prioritize needs in our local schools and is exploring options to fund these needs. In order to provide students with a safe and modern learning environment the HUSD Board of Trustees voted to place Measure H, a $381.7 million local bond measure, on the November 2018 ballot. This page contains more information about Measure H projects, fiscal accountability and frequently asked questions.

Frequently Asked Questions

Hayward Unified School District Frequently Asked Questions About Local Education Funding

How are our Hayward schools doing?

The Hayward Unified School District (HUSD) strives to prepare students to become global leaders in our dynamic society. Our dedicated teachers and strong academics challenge and motivate students to achieve success in the 21st century.

What is the condition of classrooms and school facilities in Hayward?

While we are proud of student achievement in our Hayward schools, our facilities have not kept pace. In order to maintain safe and modern learning environments, aging school facilities require necessary repairs and upgrades. As requirements for success rapidly change in the 21st century, our classrooms and labs also need to be modernized to meet today’s educational standards for science, technology, engineering and math.

How is HUSD planning to address identified needs?

In order to provide students with a safe and modern learning environment, the HUSD Board of Trustees voted to place a $381.7 million local bond measure on the November 2018 ballot. The annual cost of the measure would not exceed $60 per $100,000 of assessed value (not market value) per year.

Will this measure fund all of our school facility needs?

No, this measure will fund the most urgent and critical safety upgrades needed to support quality education. The measure will also help complete projects from previous bond measures, such as Measure L passed in 2014.  

Can’t the state fund school facility improvements?

Unfortunately, we cannot rely on the state to fund necessary repairs in our local schools. In order to maintain high-quality educational facilities and ensure our schools get the updates our students need, a local source of funding is required.

Has HUSD supported school improvement bond measures in the past?

Yes, voters have overwhelmingly supported school improvement bond measures in the past, with the passage of Measure I in 2008 and Measure L in 2014. These bonds were the first two in a planned series of four bonds to improve school facilities. HUSD has utilized these funds to make necessary school improvements to many of its schools; however, urgent repairs and upgrades are still needed to ensure all students have access to safe environments that promote high-quality learning.

What projects would the measure address?

If approved by 55% of voters, the measure would:

  • Improve student safety and campus security systems

  • Modernize outdated classroom and school facilities and replace temporary portables with permanent classrooms

  • Install solar panels at all our schools to increase energy efficiency and reduce energy costs

  • Update technology infrastructure to enable 21st-century learning

  • Repair leaky roofs and aging school facilities

  • Improve school access for students and staff with disabilities

  • Construct a district performing arts center at Mt. Eden High School

  • Complete planned projects at Lorin Eden and Winton schools

Would all bond funds stay in our HUSD schools? Could bond funding be taken by the state?

Every penny would benefit Hayward schools, would be controlled locally, and could not be taken by the state. Independent citizens’ oversight and reports to the community would be required to ensure the funds are spent as promised. No funding could ever be used to increase salaries, benefits, or pensions for administrators, teachers or other school employees.

How much would the measure cost?

The measure would cost approximately $60 per $100,000 of assessed value (not market value) per year.

Is there a senior exemption?

By law, the district cannot offer a senior exemption for bond measures. However, the cost of the measure would be based on the assessed value of a person’s property, which is different from market value. The assessed value is based on the original purchase price of a home, which is often much lower for those that have lived in their homes for a long time. Seniors also have possible options for tax relief programs through the Alameda County Assessor. For more information about assessed value and potential tax relief programs, visit the Alameda County Assessor's website www.acgov.org/accessor/decreasetax/exemptions.

Is there any other way to maintain and improve our schools?

Our district has very few options when it comes to funding the necessary maintenance that our schools need. We can’t rely on the state to complete these repairs, and redirecting funds in the current budget would take resources out of our classrooms and away from our students.

The bond measure would provide local funding to maintain and update school facilities to ensure we can provide a safe, modern learning environment for all our students.

When will I be able to vote on the measure?

The HUSD Board of Trustees voted to place the measure on the November 6, 2018 ballot.

What level of support would the measure need to pass?

The measure would need to be supported by 55% of those who vote in order to pass.

How can I register to vote or learn more about voting?

You can register to vote at www.registertovote.ca.gov. To find out more about voting in this election, please contact Alameda County Registrar of Voters at (510) 272-6973 or visit www.acvote.org.

How can I learn more about our schools?

We welcome your comments and questions as we work to ensure our students can continue to receive a high-quality education. For more information, please visit us online at www.husd.us or contact Assistant Superintendent of Business Services Allan Garde at agarde@husd.k12.ca.us.